M.Bookin

Matthew Bookin lives in Buffalo, NY.

His work has been featured in Shabby Doll House, Metazen, and Keep This Bag Away From Children.

"Hex" can be read HERE.

"No Rapture" can be read HERE.

mbookin[AT]gmail[DOT]com

@mbookin

Apr 14

Apr 8
My words inspired by the artwork of Mitsuko Brooks for the Shabby Doll Genius empire.
shabbydollhouse:

Today at Shabby Doll Genius we have Mitsuko Brooks & Matthew Bookin

My words inspired by the artwork of Mitsuko Brooks for the Shabby Doll Genius empire.

shabbydollhouse:

Today at Shabby Doll Genius we have Mitsuko Brooks & Matthew Bookin

(via bobschofield)


Apr 7
baddronemedia:

It has arrived! Volume 4 of our arts/lit mag Cage Match is back from the printer and made its debut this weekend at the Buffalo Small Press Book Fair. A huge thanks to anyone who came by and grabbed a copy. If you did happen to get the chance, head over to the webstore and pick yourself up a treat! 76 pages of full color art and writing from the following heavy hitters:
Nick Almendinger
Ben Austin
Sarah Jane Barry
Matthew Bookin
JL Coffinwasher
Jax Deluca
Jacob Drum
Bobby Griffiths
Mason Johnson
Pat Kewley
John F. Malta
Marina Muun
Ben Sears
Lucy K Shaw
Keegan Steele
Stacey Teague
Nick Torsell
Sara Turner
Jesse Witt
Go nab one!

baddronemedia:

It has arrived! Volume 4 of our arts/lit mag Cage Match is back from the printer and made its debut this weekend at the Buffalo Small Press Book Fair. A huge thanks to anyone who came by and grabbed a copy. If you did happen to get the chance, head over to the webstore and pick yourself up a treat! 76 pages of full color art and writing from the following heavy hitters:

Nick Almendinger

Ben Austin

Sarah Jane Barry

Matthew Bookin

JL Coffinwasher

Jax Deluca

Jacob Drum

Bobby Griffiths

Mason Johnson

Pat Kewley

John F. Malta

Marina Muun

Ben Sears

Lucy K Shaw

Keegan Steele

Stacey Teague

Nick Torsell

Sara Turner

Jesse Witt

Go nab one!


Mar 31
shabbydollhouse:

s u r p r i s e

real heartbreakers, every one of em

shabbydollhouse:

s u r p r i s e

real heartbreakers, every one of em


Mar 27
Gonna get real for a moment and talk about writing. Gonna use scare quotes. Gonna say art. Excuse me.
//
I finished Hex in early January and immediately made it available online. Shortly thereafter, an acquaintance of mine asked if I would like to put it in print in monthly installments via a local art/lit mag he helped edit.
My immediate reaction was: no. I had released Hex the exact way I wanted to and was ready to move onto something new. But, after some conversation, I eventually agreed to it.
The first story of the collection, “Arvada”, was printed exactly as it appears online. I heard a lot of positive feedback from people in the area and it just seemed like it was going to be a pretty cool way to put out my writing into the immediate community for a few months.
But, after I submitted the second story some problems arose. I was asked if it would be okay to replace words like “fucking” and “asshole” with “f-ing” and “a-hole.” I wouldn’t agree to that, of course, but at first I did offer to do a personal edit of the stories to “tone down the language.”
However, that compromise immediately began to bother me the more I thought about it.
The refrain of Hex, the one line all the stories are based around, is “I am a vulgar animal.” So, to tone down the vulgarity seemed like it would cripple the entire thing. More than that, the very validity of what is and isn’t vulgar started to come into question.
In my opinion, the first line of the first story of Hex is the most obscene moment in the entire collection:
"The girl you hate wipes her belly off with a purple bleach-scarred towel."
No obscene language, just an implication. And that ran in print completely unedited. What was being brought to me as “too obscene” lead me to believe the publishers and I were looking at producing art from completely different perspectives.
Hex is absolutely an often obscene and sometimes downright transgressive collection of stories, at the very least when compared with other things I’ve written. I knew this would be the case before I started writing it. When talk of making edits for content started, I knew there was no way to “make it more accessible” without completely fucking the whole thing (and myself) over.
Eventually, when discussion began about making the stories tame enough for children to read, I knew Hex was in absolutely the wrong place and politely began the process of withdrawing from the publication.
In the end it wasn’t about what is and isn’t obscene. It was about knowing when to make compromises and when to stand behind what you’ve made.
I’m absolutely grateful for the opportunity I was given, it really did give me a nice amount of exposure in the local scene and the editors that were trying to make it work were very kind to me. It just ended up being a learning experience, and if I look on the bright side, a performance art experiment in which I put “Arvada” on hundreds of doorsteps throughout the city.
//
But! April is going to be fucking cool.
The Buffalo Small Press Fair is next week. I’ll have two new stories in the fourth volume of Cage Match and something else I’m not going to talk about just yet should be available there too.
I’ll also have a piece online sometime during the month in conjunction with my favorite house.
Finally, on April 4th I’ll be taking part in a reading along with Cassandra Gillig, Sarah Jean Alexander, Pat Kewley, and Jacob Drum. It’ll be the real deal.
The shoulder of my winter jacket ripped wide open yesterday for no reason. Warm weather on the way.
Curses Forever.
mrb

Gonna get real for a moment and talk about writing. Gonna use scare quotes. Gonna say art. Excuse me.

//

I finished Hex in early January and immediately made it available online. Shortly thereafter, an acquaintance of mine asked if I would like to put it in print in monthly installments via a local art/lit mag he helped edit.

My immediate reaction was: no. I had released Hex the exact way I wanted to and was ready to move onto something new. But, after some conversation, I eventually agreed to it.

The first story of the collection, “Arvada”, was printed exactly as it appears online. I heard a lot of positive feedback from people in the area and it just seemed like it was going to be a pretty cool way to put out my writing into the immediate community for a few months.

But, after I submitted the second story some problems arose. I was asked if it would be okay to replace words like “fucking” and “asshole” with “f-ing” and “a-hole.” I wouldn’t agree to that, of course, but at first I did offer to do a personal edit of the stories to “tone down the language.”

However, that compromise immediately began to bother me the more I thought about it.

The refrain of Hex, the one line all the stories are based around, is “I am a vulgar animal.” So, to tone down the vulgarity seemed like it would cripple the entire thing. More than that, the very validity of what is and isn’t vulgar started to come into question.

In my opinion, the first line of the first story of Hex is the most obscene moment in the entire collection:

"The girl you hate wipes her belly off with a purple bleach-scarred towel."

No obscene language, just an implication. And that ran in print completely unedited. What was being brought to me as “too obscene” lead me to believe the publishers and I were looking at producing art from completely different perspectives.

Hex is absolutely an often obscene and sometimes downright transgressive collection of stories, at the very least when compared with other things I’ve written. I knew this would be the case before I started writing it. When talk of making edits for content started, I knew there was no way to “make it more accessible” without completely fucking the whole thing (and myself) over.

Eventually, when discussion began about making the stories tame enough for children to read, I knew Hex was in absolutely the wrong place and politely began the process of withdrawing from the publication.

In the end it wasn’t about what is and isn’t obscene. It was about knowing when to make compromises and when to stand behind what you’ve made.

I’m absolutely grateful for the opportunity I was given, it really did give me a nice amount of exposure in the local scene and the editors that were trying to make it work were very kind to me. It just ended up being a learning experience, and if I look on the bright side, a performance art experiment in which I put “Arvada” on hundreds of doorsteps throughout the city.

//

But! April is going to be fucking cool.

The Buffalo Small Press Fair is next week. I’ll have two new stories in the fourth volume of Cage Match and something else I’m not going to talk about just yet should be available there too.

I’ll also have a piece online sometime during the month in conjunction with my favorite house.

Finally, on April 4th I’ll be taking part in a reading along with Cassandra Gillig, Sarah Jean Alexander, Pat Kewley, and Jacob Drum. It’ll be the real deal.

The shoulder of my winter jacket ripped wide open yesterday for no reason. Warm weather on the way.

Curses Forever.

mrb


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